Building the One Page Business Plan for Real Estate Investors

By on January 9, 2012

As we saw in my last article, building a business plan helps you focus, prioritize and measure your business. Consider it your roadmap to success. You start at point A and get to the next point. If you miss a turn, you can always refer back to it and readjust.

Today, we’re going to talk about building the one page business plan for real estate investors. Most business plan templates are long – somewhere between 6 and 10 pages or more. And there is a time and a place for that, but the one-pager is manageable and you can actually get to it if its one page. Jim Horan writes a book that guides you through the process fittingly titled The One Page Business Plan. He has a few different versions of it – one for the creative entrepreneur and one for the professional consultant. As a real estate investor interested in acting as an authority on a particular deal type or as an investor seeking creative financing options, these books could be just what you need. Take a look at their table of contents before you select one for purchase.

But for today’s article, let’s hit the high points on what goes into a one-page business plan for real estate investors.

Start with your business vision. What is the end result for your business this year or at the end of your business plan period? Your vision statement is the plan you have for your business. It’s articulating what your business will look like after you make this plan work.

Write down your value/mission statement. This section serves two purposes – it gives you an answer to “what do you do?” and it helps you make decisions about who to work with. In other words, your vision statement acts as a gut check. If a deal or person isn’t in line with this mission, why would you work with them? Sure, we’re all in business to make money, but do you really want to compromise your values? This statement helps you determine what those business values are.

Set clear objectives. Your objectives are the three to seven things (these numbers are manageable) you want your business to do this year or over a set period of time. Maybe you want to set yours business plan up for the next three to five years. The key to objectives is to make sure they fit three criteria – realistic, measurable and they have a date attached.

Lay down your strategies. Your strategies are the tactics you will use to achieve your goals. These are the “how you will get there” statements. Some example REI strategies include:

  • “Attend weekly REIA meetings and make X number of contacts per week.”
  • “Build my list of people who I know that may be interested in real estate investments by X date.”
  • “Get my REI website up by X date.”
  • “Develop relationships with a bird dog Realtor, a wholesaler and a contractor by X date.”

The important part of your strategies section is that they line up with your vision and help you achieve your objectives. If they don’t pass this test, take them off the plan. This plan needs to be solid, so delete the fluff and be realistic about what you can do. Measure your time and be sure to challenge yourself.

Spell out your plans. Your plans are the less solid objectives. These are the things you want to achieve. The key word here is want. It would be nice if they happened, but they don’t have to happen to make your year.

See some sample one page business plans here.  We’re going to talk about other types of business plans this month, but this should serve as a guide if you’re looking for a quick start guide. Stay tuned for more business planning tips on The Investor Insights blog this month.

About Susan Lassiter-Lyons

Susan is the author of Mortgage Secrets for Real Estate Investors and founder of the award-winning real estate blog, TheInvestorInsights.com. A real estate investor since 1994, Susan has raised $26.2 million in private money and participated in more than 600 transactions as an investor, broker, lender, syndicator and advisor. Susan is a dedicated trainer and her training, seminars and coaching programs have transformed the lives and businesses of thousands of real estate investors worldwide.

10 Comments

  1. Musu

    January 9, 2012 at 12:31 pm

    Susan,
    This could not have come in at a better time for me. I woke up this morning with business plan on my mind but just the thought of doing multiple pages seemed daunting. Then I checked my email and voila!, there it is – your topic of the day! :)

    Thanks so much for sharing this, you are the best!

  2. Susan

    January 9, 2012 at 2:03 pm

    Yay! You bet Musu!

  3. Jeff

    January 28, 2012 at 5:28 pm

    I spent 8K on our master plan we will see if it pays off or not but you can believe without some kind of business plan your sunk before you start for me spending the money on a professional company was the only way to go because our company aspirations are much higher than the normal standards.

    We are already an active rehab flip company and Susan you do deliver some awesome content. I agree you are good at speaking if you can get the lip smacking under control you will go from good to GREAT. I have done some public speaking and studied communications in college because of my love for public speaking i would love to see you get the one thing under control!

    Your not just a junk salesman (lady) but i hate the Guru thing personally and get so tired of hearing it

    • Susan

      January 28, 2012 at 5:37 pm

      You spent $8K for a master plan??! Way too much in my opinion. You’re perfectly capable of articulating your own aspirations. Thanks for the feedback on the speaking.

  4. harsh sheth

    July 17, 2012 at 9:45 am

    Awsome! really liked…

  5. Quantella Owens

    August 27, 2012 at 8:48 am

    Sorry. While I really get a lot from you and your blog and the way you use data, I have to disagree here. I think that in this particular environment…the only thing a business plan is good for is to give your competition a road map to your thinking process and a way to rip off your best work. I guess if you aren’t giving to investors or using it to hire from, then you are probably fine. But I would call that a strategic plan and not a business plan. Maybe its’ just a difference in wording…..

    • Susan

      August 27, 2012 at 9:08 am

      Hmmm. I’ve never given a business plan to a competitor but I’m curious why you feel they are only good for giving “your competition a road map to your thinking process and a way to rip off your best work.”

      If you’re saying that you choose not to reveal key aspects of your business to potential investment and private money partners, I think you’ll have a tough time building those relationships.

  6. Pingback: How to Plan Your Month, Week & Day for Success | The Investor Insights

  7. henry

    October 26, 2012 at 9:43 am

    hey suzie q!just to inform you that you are just as sweet as they get on your empowerment of planning! awesome support and video modules! very strong! and complete!yes! i am going to implement all your information! and ! will execute that plan with mr.p ely! you know who i am refering to! thank you very much ! wuv ya! always your member mr.henry!m! stockton california!

  8. Fredrick

    July 22, 2014 at 8:12 pm

    Want info in better ways to invest

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